Don't Want to Hear It . . .

 Jeffrey Maier and Mark Texiera

Jeffrey Maier and Mark Texiera

Seriously, I do not want to hear about this call going against the Yankees.  Not because the Yankees expect every call to go their way and complain when they don't.  Also not because an overwhelming amount of close/bad calls DO go the Yankees' way.  Not even because this feels like - in some small way - to be karmic payback for Jeffrey Maier.

I do not want to hear about it because all 30 Major League Baseball teams have had AT LEAST one non-reviewable call go against them this year that in some way "cost" them a game.  That's the nature of the game until MLB institutes a more complete video review system.  That is not excusing bad calls, but it is just the reality of the current situation.  This was a missed call but it no way should it be treated as any more important than any other blown call.  All teams are hurt by missed calls during a season.

I also do not want to hear about it because sliding headfirst into first base is a high-risk/low-reward play.  Major League Baseball umpires, in general, make calls at first base by looking at when the ball lands in the first baseman's glove and listening for the sound of the runner's foot hitting the bag.  This is a necessity - umpires cannot look in two places at one time any more than the rest of us can.  By sliding into first base, a runner takes away the ability for an umpire to hear the sound of his foot touching the base.  Secondly, sliding slows the runner down.  In almost every case, a runner is better off running through first base then sliding into the bag.  The third point is that it is a risky play from an injury standpoint.  It is not a smart baseball play and the argument could certainly be made that Teixeira hurt his chances of being called safe by choosing to slide into the base headfirst.